New Peugeot 5008 MPV

From £23,320

Gearbox

Automatic or Manual

Seats

7

Doors

5

Boot size

679 - 823 litres

The Auto Trader verdict
★★★★★
★★★★★
3.7
The 5008 is a flexible SUV with a premium feel that drives well and includes plenty of equipment for your money. Unlike many of its rivals, all variants have seven seats as standard, although space for adults in the second and third rows is limited. It’s not for those that need off-road capability, as there’s no four-wheel drive option, but on the road, it’s impressively capable and comes with a choice of good petrol and diesel engines. Depending on your needs, it’s worth considering alongside the likes of Skoda’s Kodiaq, Nissan’s X-Trail and even the Land Rover Discovery Sport.

Pros

  • Good to drive
  • Premium feel inside
  • Seven seats as standard

Cons

  • No four-wheel drive option
  • Head-room is limited in rear seats
  • Third row of seats is for kids only

Full review

By Phill Tromans   Wednesday 04 October 2017
2017 Peugeot 5008

Exterior
★★★★★
★★★★★
4/5

The 5008 features a highly stylised front end, but the demands of space and practicality dictate the need for a long, horizontal roof, that finishes at a rather bluff rear end. The headlights are either halogen or LED, depending on the model you go for; and, while the famous Peugeot lion sits proudly on the grille, the rear LED lights are designed to look like a pair of big cat’s claws. There are four versions of the 5008 to choose from, starting with the entry-level Active, and moving to Allure, GT Line and top-of-the-range GT, and all of them get alloy wheels, ranging in size from 17 to 19 inches. Posher models can be identified by the chequered design of their grille, scuff plates under their bumpers and copper-effect badges.

2017 Peugeot 5008

Interior
★★★★★
★★★★★
3/5

Peugeot has made a concerted effort to move its interiors upmarket in recent years, and there’s a premium feel to the 5008’s cabin, both in terms of its styling and the quality of most of the materials used. The major exception to this are the rather flimsy-feeling levers that you pull on to tip the middle row of seats forward and allow folk to get into the third row of seats.

The driving position is raised, and the low dashboard enhances that commanding feel by giving a nice, wide view of the road ahead. The small sports-style steering wheel does feel slightly out of place in such a large vehicle, however; and, despite having a flat top and bottom, some folk will still find that, even with the wheel set in its lowest position, it obscures a part of the digital dashboard that shows the speed and engine revs.

Most aspects of the infotainment system and even the air-conditioning are controlled through the 8.0-inch touch-screen on the centre console. Thankfully, there are piano key-style shortcut buttons which will let you jump between menus, without having to rely solely on the touch-screen.

Practicality
★★★★★
★★★★★
4/5

Many of the 5008’s rivals only offer a third row of seats as an option, or as standard just on higher-end versions, but all 5008s come with seven seats. Sadly, though, because the cabin is quite narrow, these seats aren’t surrounded by enough space. Taller adults will really struggle for headroom in the second row (at least, they will on the sunroof-equipped models we tried); and, they should forget about travelling longer distances in the third row, because the limited head- and legroom mean it’s really only suitable for children.

The seating arrangement is pretty flexible, however. All three second-row seats are the same size and each one can be adjusted or folded down separately with a tug of a lever; and, the third-row chairs fold away under the boot floor, or can be removed entirely for extra luggage space.

With seven chairs in place, you’ll have enough room for a few shopping bags, but not much else. However, with the car st up in five-seat mode, cargo space gets a lot more generous and compares well with other cars in the class. Space grows to van-like proportions in two-seat mode; and, should you want to transport a particularly long item, you also have the option to fold down the front passenger seat back.

2017 Peugeot 5008

Ride and handling
★★★★★
★★★★★
4/5

The key to the success of any family car lies in how well its body is controlled, because the last thing you want is for the kids to start feeling queasy the moment you pull away from your drive. However, the 5008 is a bit of a mixed bag. Basically, because the suspension needs to be strong enough to support the weight of up to seven folks, it can feel a little firm when you're driving on your own. You’ll notice this particularly at low speeds, because the car tends to shimmy from side-to-side, and you’ll hear and sense the rear wheels clattering over rougher surfaces.

Thankfully, as speeds rise, things become more settled: the suspension warms to its task, ironing out those initial shimmies, making a decent fist of controlling vertical body movements, and dealing with imperfections in the road in impressive fashion. You will notice some road noise, especially on cars with larger wheels, but that’s mainly because the rest of the car is so quiet.

Although it’s quite narrow, the 5008 is a long car; but, despite this, it’s still pretty agile on twisty roads, with impressively little body roll in corners, yet another win-win for the little fellas. Although there’s no four-wheel drive option, we drove a 5008 over some modest dirt roads and it coped with ease. However, if you plan to venture a long way from asphalt, look towards rivals like the Skoda Kodiaq, Nissan X-Trail or Land Rover Discovery Sport.

2017 Peugeot 5008

Performance
★★★★★
★★★★★
4/5

The most popular engine is likely to be the 118bhp 1.6-litre BlueHDi diesel engine, and there’s a good reason for that. As well as being extremely smooth and quiet, it has plenty of low- and mid-range power, so it’s ideally suited to tugging the 5008 around, even with Uncle Tom Cobley and all on board. We’d also recommend you fork out a little bit extra for the six-speed automatic gearbox that’s available as an option with this engine. It’s actually quite an old gearbox and some of its shifts aren’t quite as seamless as the latest eight-speed units, but it does have an encouragingly soft pause between gears, and it helps maintain smooth momentum far better than even the most skilled drivers will achieve with the six-speed manual gearbox.

With petrol-powered cars rising in popularity, the 128bhp 1.2-litre three-cylinder PureTech engine is also likely to be popular. Despite its small capacity, it’s punchy and more than capable of carrying a couple of people around town, but we’ve yet to see how it copes with a fully loaded car.

A less popular choice will be the 1.6-litre four-cylinder petrol unit, which is a shame, really. It’s certainly no spring chicken, but it does show that, if you get an engine right from the off, it will stand the test of time. It’s extremely strong and flexible, and endows the 5008 with a surprisingly brisk turn of speed. What’s more, it’s also a good deal smoother and quieter than the three-cylinder engine.

For those who tow or regularly travel loaded up with people and luggage, the more powerful 2.0 BlueHDI turbodiesel, with 178bhp, will be more appealing, because it pulls effortlessly from low in the rev range. However, it’s only available in the top-spec model, at a price where other premium rivals may prove attractive.

Running costs
★★★★★
★★★★★
3/5

The 5008 comes well equipped, but it’s not a particularly cheap car to buy. That said, Peugeot dealers will be very keen to secure your custom, so go in low and be prepared to negotiate hard. Resale values will play a significant part in long-term running costs for the 5008, but it’s still rather early to be sure what those will be, although Peugeots don’t historically hold their values particularly well. However, fuel economy and CO2 emissions across the range compare very favourably to the 5008's rivals, which will make all the difference to tax liabilities and fuel bills.

Reliability
★★★★★
★★★★★
4/5

Peugeot’s reliability has been improving in recent years, and the brand now features firmly in the top half of Warranty Direct’s manufacturer standings. Obviously, there’s very little data on the latest 5008 as an individual model, but with the standard of its build quality and materials, we wouldn’t be surprised if it continued Peugeot’s upward trajectory.

2017 Peugeot 5008

Safety
★★★★★
★★★★★
4/5

There hasn’t been a Euro NCAP crash test of the new 5008 yet, so we’ll have to wait to see how it fares. However, the smaller 3008, which shares much of the same mechanical underpinnings, scored a maximum five stars, which bodes well. A good amount of safety equipment is included as standard on all models, including a speed sign recognition system and a driver attention warning system that watches driving behaviour to detect lapses in concentration.

Most notably, automatic emergency braking, which will take apply the brakes if the car detects you’re about to crash into something and you don’t respond, is also included.
With Allure specification and above, the 5008 uses cameras to detect any cars in the blind spot over your shoulder; and, it comes with active lane keep assistance, which will tweak the brakes to bring you back into your lane if you cross the lane markers without indicating.

Equipment
★★★★★
★★★★★
4/5

There are four trim levels on the 5008, but all come with a DAB radio and connectivity for a range of mobile phones, including Mirrorlink and Apple CarPlay. Rear parking sensors, along with automatic headlights and windscreen wipers, are also included on the base model.

Cars from the second-tier Allure upwards appear to be the best bet, as they come with sat-nav and voice recognition, along with front and rear parking sensors and a reversing camera. Inside, the kids will no doubt be pleased to see rear-seat trays, under-floor storage bins and window blinds.

GT-Line vehicles get full LED headlights and indicators, leather and cloth seat trim and lots of styling enhancements. The most powerful 2.0-litre diesel engine is only available with top-end GT trim, which adds adaptive cruise control and leather seats that feature a heating and massage function.

Why buy?
★★★★★
★★★★★
3/5

The 5008 feels like a more premium alternative to the likes of the Nissan X-Trail and Hyundai Santa Fe, but it’s also a cheaper option than the Land Rover Discovery Sport. The standard seven seats will be a big draw to larger families, as will the range of efficient petrol and diesel engines. It drives well and comes with plenty of standard kit, but take the time to make sure your passengers fit in the back before you sign on the dotted line.

Our recommendations

From the range of the new Peugeot 5008, these are the ones we suggest you look at

Pick of the range
1.6 Blue HDi 120 Auto Allure
Smooth engine and gearbox, and it comes with plenty of kit
Most economical
1.6L BlueHDi 100 S&S 5-speed manual Active
Commendable fuel returns, but very basic
Best avoided
2.0L BlueHDi 180 Automatic
£11,000 more than the entry car. Need we say more?
Choose your Peugeot 5008
At Auto Trader, we have reviews from people who have owned this car and can inform you on what it's like to live with
Owners verdict
★★★★★
★★★★★
2.9
Read owner reviews

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