New Aston Martin DB11 Coupe

From £159,955

Gearbox

Automatic

Seats

4

Doors

2

Boot size

The Auto Trader verdict
★★★★★
★★★★★
3.4
The Aston Martin DB11 is a car that’s dripping with character, thanks to its sleek looks, loveable-rogue image, and an intoxicating V12 engine that bewitches you with both its sound and power. Make no mistake, though, this car is raw and unruly, and at times, a real handful to drive. Yes, it’s fun, but you really need to keep your wits about you. What’s more, you’ll find some slightly questionable interior panels and some poor ergonomics.

Pros

  • Engine has unbelievable sound and power
  • Looks great and has a fantastic image
  • Strong resale value helps protect your investment

Cons

  • Too demanding to drive quickly
  • Disappointing interior materials in places
  • Practicality should be better

Full review

By Ivan Aistrop   Friday 02 December 2016
2016 Aston Martin DB11

Exterior
★★★★★
★★★★★
5/5

The DB11 is the first of a new generation of cars for Aston Martin, but stylistically at least, the company hasn’t thrown the baby out with the bathwater. The DB11 has sharper, more aggressive and more modern looks than the DB9 it replaces, but there’s still plenty there to identify it – unmistakably – as an Aston. Few will argue that this is one very handsome car, and it certainly gets its share of admiring looks from passers-by. Which, with a car like this, is half the fun.

Interior
★★★★★
★★★★★
3/5

Aston have struck up a new partnership with Mercedes, meaning that much of the technology you’ll find on board the DB11, such as the infotainment system, much of the switchgear, and some of the other controls, are recognisable from that brand. That’s no bad thing, because it all looks smart and works pretty well. Things are far from perfect in the Aston’s cockpit, though. The quality of some of the materials and finishes leaves a lot to be desired – especially considering the vast amount the car costs – and the electric seat controls are so confusing that you might well fold yourself in half before you work out how to move your seat in the desired direction. The dashboard is set high in relation to the seats, making the cabin feel a little claustrophobic, and it’s impossible to see the extremities of the bonnet, making it difficult to place the car when parking.

Practicality
★★★★★
★★★★★
2/5

Not an area of vital importance for a car like this, but as it’ll inevitably be called upon for grand touring duties from time to time, it’s essential you have enough space for the luggage you’ll need for your weekend trip to the south of France. It does, but only just. The wide-but-shallow boot, which measures 270 litres, has enough space for a couple of overnight bags and a couple of small soft bags, but no more than that. You can fit more luggage on the rear seats if needs be, which is actually the best use for them because you certainly wouldn’t want to put a person in them. A severe shortage of headroom, legroom and foot space mean that even a child would struggle to fit. A Bentley Continental GT offers far more practicality that the DB11, and despite having two fewer seats, a McLaren 570GT has an edge over it as well.

Ride and handling
★★★★★
★★★★★
2/5

Like many rivals these days, the DB11 has a suspension that varies its behaviour according to which driving mode you select, and you’ll also notice some variation in the behaviour of the steering, throttle and transmission. Whichever mode you choose, though, driving the Aston quickly is a very demanding experience. The suspension allows a surprising amount of vertical movement, resulting in a just-as-surprising amount of dive and squat to be felt at either end of the car. This, combined with the fact that the car will hop sideways over mid-corner bumps, makes it feel rather unsettled when you’re threading it through bends in double-quick time. What’s more, that unsettled feeling is exacerbated further by hyper-sensitive pedals for the brake and throttle. Get too greedy with the latter, and you’ll be spinning up those rear wheels with unnerving ease. The ride isn’t ideal, either, feeling crashy at low speeds and jumpy at higher speeds. At least the steering is very direct and has a good amount of feel. Overall, the Aston is an enjoyable car to drive, but you have to take the time to learn all its little foibles and work around them. And, even when you do, rival cars like the McLaren 570 GT are still much more enjoyable.

Performance
★★★★★
★★★★★
5/5

The DB11 is powered by a twin-turbocharged 5.2-litre petrol engine, and it’s nothing short of sensational. For starters, it sounds absolutely epic, with a tuneful growl at low revs that builds into a full-chested bellow as the revs rise. The pace it provides is pretty staggering, too. With 600bhp and 516lb ft of torque to play with, it’ll thrust you from 0-62mph in a none-too-shabby 3.9 seconds, and under the direction of a very persistent right foot, it won’t top out until you’re doing 200mph. However, the sensation is far more impressive than the numbers, with that huge wall of torque giving you instant and explosive reactions to any sort of pressure on the throttle pedal. Unfortunately, the one black mark is that the eight-speed automatic gearbox doesn’t always react quickly enough to keep up, which can blunt the speed of your progress, especially on the downshift.

Running costs
★★★★★
★★★★★
4/5

Nobody on the planet will be under any illusion that an Aston Martin comes cheap. Not only does the huge list price make this car the sole preserve of the staggeringly wealthy, anyone that does buy one will also need to factor in several thousand pounds on top of that to specify it precisely to their taste by going nuts with the extensive – and pricey – options list. The engine comes with cylinder shut-off technology to make it more efficient, but even so, it’s still greedier for super-unleaded than some of its rivals. Bills for fuel – along with insurance and tyres – will be huge, but it’ll be nothing that those wealthy enough to buy the car will worry about. What they might worry about, though, is depreciation, because with a car this expensive, the losses can be absolutely huge. The good news is that the DB11 protects your investment better than most rivals, so the amount you’ll lose when you sell it on will be minimised.

Reliability
★★★★★
★★★★★
3/5

It’s pretty difficult to get a feel for the car’s mechanical dependability. As a brand, Aston Martin doesn’t feature in most reliability surveys, because the firm’s cars sell in such low numbers. Browse the owner reviews on our own website that relate to Aston Martins, and the comments on reliability are largely very positive, with only one or two horror stories reported. That said, though, if we were buying, we’d take Aston up on any offer of extended warranties and servicing packages. If you’re left to bankroll any work on your own, it’ll be very pricey. A three-year, unlimited mileage warranty comes as standard, and unusually and pretty generously, so does a five-year/50,000-mile servicing plan. Still worth extending, though.

Safety
★★★★★
★★★★★
4/5

Don’t go expecting to see the DB11 feature on any list of Euro NCAP crash test results any time soon. Very unlikely to happen. That said, you do get a decent amount of safety kit provided, including a whole host of airbags and even more electronic driving aids to help keep the car going in the right direction. You don’t get autonomous emergency braking, though, which in a car this expensive, is a bit of an oversight.

Equipment
★★★★★
★★★★★
3/5

The DB11 we drove was a Launch Edition car, which account for the first 1,000 examples of the car, each one getting the personal dynamic sign-off from Aston Martin CEO Andy Palmer. The standard equipment includes leather upholstery, keyless entry, cruise control, heated seats, seats, climate control and an entertainment system that includes Bluetooth, sat-nav, DAB, a wifi hotspot and a 1000-watt stereo. The options list is extensive, with many of the choices being largely cosmetic, but you can order additional kit like an automatic parking assistant and ventilated seats.

Why buy?
★★★★★
★★★★★
3/5

Because you’re sold on the DB11’s looks and image, and all the James Bond-style glamour that goes with them. Also, because you want a car that sounds and goes like little else on the road. Be careful, though, because if you’re expecting a rounded, polished driving experience, you might well be disappointed. It is fun, but in an unruly and very demanding kind of a way.

Aston Martin

DB11

From £159,955

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Information regarding the vehicle advertised is obtained from various sources, whilst we endeavour to keep the information up to date and correct, changes in pricing and the vehicle specification may have occurred since the content was published. Always check with the Dealer before entering into any agreement.