Audi

A1

Hatchback

Current model (2014 - )

Back to Audi A1 Hatchback

Choose what matters to you

£

Budget



Gearbox
How to choose?

Gearbox

Manual

  • Usually cheaper to buy than automatic
  • Driver in full control of gear selection
  • Can become tiresome in stop-start traffic
  • Many small cars only available with manual transmission

Automatic

  • Relaxed drive with option for manual control in many cars
  • Usually more expensive to buy than manual
  • Work well with larger engines, and in larger cars
  • Many are less fuel-efficient than manual equivalents
Fuel type
How to choose?

Fuel type

Petrol

  • Generally cheaper than diesel
  • Petrol cars tend to be cheaper than equivalent diesel
  • Tends to suit buyers with lower annual mileages
  • Widely available, so no problem filling up

Diesel

  • Generally gives better economy than petrol
  • Widely available, so no problem filling up
  • Generally lower CO2 emissions than equivalent petrol
  • Not suited to lots of short journeys

Electric

  • Gives quiet and relaxing drive
  • Very low running costs, thanks to zero CO2 emissions
  • Takes longer to recharge than to refuel petrol or diesel car
  • Shorter range on full charge than on full tank in petrol or diesel car

Hybrid

  • Combines benefits of electric car with longer range
  • Best suited to drivers who spend most of their time in town
  • Plug-in hybrids need to be charged – which can take hours
  • A diesel car will probably be more economical on long motorway runs
Doors
How to choose?

Doors

2 doors

  • This layout is generally confined to sports cars or small cars
  • May make access to any rear seats awkward
  • Has no hatchback boot, so could have limited practicality
  • The doors may be long, making them awkward to open in tight spaces

3 doors

  • Some people find this more stylish than equivalent five-door
  • Third ‘door’ is hatchback boot
  • May make access to any rear seats awkward
  • The doors may be long, making them awkward to open in tight spaces

4 doors

  • Better access to rear seats than in 2/3dr car
  • Four-door layout means no hatchback boot, so may be less practical
  • Rear doors may have child locks

5 doors

  • Better access to rear seats than in 2/3dr car
  • Fifth ‘door’ is hatchback boot, meaning good practicality, especially in estates
  • Rear doors may have child locks